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Our Ultimate Guide To Caring For Your Camera

waterfall photo tour

As a photographer, we don’t need to tell you that the most important tool in your arsenal (apart from a good imagination) is your camera. Whether it’s a lower end $200 compact camera or the priciest DSLR available in the market, it is the most important and most expensive investment, so it makes sense that you should take the best care of it possible. Here’s our guide on the best ways to treat your camera the way it deserves.

Get a proper cleaning cloth 

We’re always out on the field, so lenses get smudged and dirt, dust and snow gathers on the body – we know a thing or two about dirty cameras! While your T-shirt might seem, at the moment, the most convenient option, stop doing that and get yourself a proper cleaning cloth. When you use your t-shirt, not only are you transferring sweat and grime onto your lens, the wrong type of fabric could also easily scratch your lens. Get yourself a lens tissue, micro fibre cloth and a brush designed specially for lenses. It costs next to nothing, but keeps your camera clean and safe in the long term.

Don’t overexpose the sensor 

If you’re using a DSLR, chances are you’ll have to expose the sensor whenever you switch lenses. Yet, did you know that the sensor is practically a magnet for dust, especially if you’re outdoors? What you want to do is to minimise the exposure time, so never change lenses when you’re distracted with something else. Also, keep your camera facing downward as you remove and replace the lens, as this helps reduce the amount of particles that could enter.

Get a dedicated camera bag 

We have seen so many people simply chuck their camera or lens into whatever bag they have on, which is an absolute no-no. Camera bags come with padding that protect your camera from scratches, or having its sensitive electric components damaged if you accidentally swing and knock your bag against something. Most camera bags are also waterproof, which is likely not the case for your purse! There are so many designs and styles available that there is surely something to suit your taste – many camera bags these days look like stylish backpacks or tote backs. Who says you have to give up form for function?

Don’t use compressed air 

Ironically, you will find these in camera shops, but leave them where they are. The problem with compressed air is that it isn’t just air in there, but a host of other chemicals that you should not be exposing your camera to. Some of these containers even come with the warning that there are chemicals that may discolour plastic, and canned air allows for vapour to escape with the air, which could seriously damage your camera’s sensor over time. Use a brush or hand blower instead.

Use a filter 

Your camera’s lens is naturally fragile, so you should consider adding a filter (which improves the quality of your photographs anyway!) to protect it. If you drop your camera, your filter will break before the lens of the glass, which will save you a ton on repairs. Read our guide to filters to see which best suits your needs. 

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